4.02.2005

Pope John Paul II

When I heard the quote below on the radio today, I nearly started to cry. I was so sad, and I have no immediate explanation as to why. I appreciate what Magdalen said, as it helps me see that my greek friend does not represent all orthodox people. In his comments on the matter of the Pope's immanent passing, he lacked compassion.
Tonight, when I prayed for him, it was "Lord have mercy on him and save him" and I think I was praying for his passing. I don't even think it appropriate to call it death, and I think that is why I wanted to cry, because I could see what the guy on the radio said, "tonight, Jesus opens the gate of heaven to welcome the pope" or something like that. what a beautiful image. How could anyone be sad to know that He has gone home, and that we will be able to be with them all one day. the image of God in my mind is one of a traveller, on a long journey, has finally reached his destination, the presence of God, and he is welcomed in to the warmth with open arms, and celebration, dusting the snow of this cold world off his boots, he takes off his heavy peacoat, his hat and scarf, and he is given a beautiful meal. He sits with the son of God in the most peaceful silence, like two people who have known each other well for many years, knowing there is much to talk about, but cherishing the silence, and each others company, something they both have been longing for for many years, a reunion above many others.
I don't know if He is still here on earth, or with God directly, but no, we have not lost him totally, merely physically. it does mean though a new era for the history of the church and the world (since the planet is 1/6th catholic) and we ought to pray that God guides the selection of the new pope. may God have mercy on the Holy See of Rome.

4 comments:

Magdalen said...

I'm curious as to what your greek friend said, though perhaps it's not for me to ask or know.
I am grieved at his passing, in that his influence, compassion and obvious love for Christ will be sorely missed, and I pray that the new Pope will rise to the occasion as did Pope John Paul II. But as a christian, I can't help but rejoice for his entry into the Kingdom and Eternal Rest. Obviously his journey, like ours, is not totally complete until the Second Coming and Resurrection of creation, but for now he can rest with Christ, and for that I am glad.

biss said...

May his memory be eternal.

Ed Doerksen said...

The passing of Pope John Paul II will be remembered and cherished by many. He bridged many religious gaps, was forceful with grace and respect. His compassion for people will be missed. He leaves larger than life shoes behind to fill.

He was controversal, yet encouraging. Wasn't afraid to speak his mind and did so in a manner that was acceptable even to those that niether cared for nor supported him.

The world has experienced a man who challenged all in both sickness and in health.

Thanks Dave for your thoughts in your posting.

heather said...

Part of me feels sad that so many "christians" are beginning to feel lost as they consider the passing of the Pope. I feel like someone should scream out in Italian - or any other language. Jesus Christ hasn't changed people! He's alive and well!

Still, the death of such a faithful follower of Christ is sad for many, and mourning his death is valid.

I was talking to some people today about the example Pope John Paul II's life is proving to be - even in his death.

It's the hope of every follower of Christ, isn't it? That we live lives so faithful to Jesus that people will be drawn to him and he will be glorified in our deaths. JP II's life is doing just that, even now at his weakest. It's awesome!